Visit our other websites:    On CE    eSP    Mobile Channels    ECI news    rAVe Europe    Digital Signage News EMEA    iChannels

JUST for Geeks

A Mini Heater to Heat PC User Hands

E-mail Print PDF
A Mini Heater to Heat PC User Hands

"No more cold hands," the Kickstarter for the Heatbuff promises-- and just as well, since the crowdfunded device in question is a small heater designed to warm the hands of keyboard and mouse users.

The Heatbuff uses infrared as a "no-burn technology" in order to keep fingers toasty, all while not melting keyboards or mice down. The actual device is around 38cm wide, and features twin heaters one can adjust and angle from the centre to customise the amount of heat provided.

Continue reading...

Acer Monitors the Air at MWC

E-mail Print PDF
Acer Monitors the Air at MWC

Mobile World Congress 2017 sees Acer announce the Air Monitor-- a connected device providing real-time air quality analysis through companion app and a colour-changing LED embedded in the chassis.

Part of the company's "Internet of Beings" (IoB), the Air Monitor tracks 6 air quality indicators, namely TVOC (Total Volatile Organic Compounds), carbon dioxide, PM2.5, PM10, temperature and humidity. The smartphone app allows users to easily access the measured data, and it can also send warnings via push notifications when indicators exceed predefined thresholds.

Continue reading...

Disney Shows Room-Scale Wireless Power

E-mail Print PDF
Disney Shows Room-Scale Wireless Power

Scientists at Disney Research present what one can describe as room-scale wireless power delivery-- a prototype living room housing 10 objects, all powered without need for cables.

Dubbed "Quasistatic Cavity Resonance for Ubiquitous Wireless Power Transfer," the technology is free roaming, meaning one can move around the room and their smartphone will immediately start charging, with no need to be close to a wireless charging pad. It is also very efficient (around 40-95%, depending on the receiver's position in the room) and can deliver 1900W of power before the specific absorption rate (SAR) becomes dangerous for human beings.

However, like all things sounding too good to be true, the technology comes with a caveat-- it requires a purpose-built room, with walls, ceilings and floor built out of aluminium panels. A long copper pole runs in the middle of the room, and half-way down the pipe is a small section housing a ring of 15 capacitors. Outside the room are a signal generator and a power amplifier linked to the capacitors, which together with the copper pipe produce quasistatic cavity resonance (QSCR), the process behind the wireless power transfer technology.

Continue reading...

A Smartwatch for Games

E-mail Print PDF
A Smartwatch for Games

Do your customers want to play games on their wrists? The Gameband offers a dedicated solution, since it is described as a "powerful smartwatch" built for "people who love to game."

The Gameband comes in two versions-- an Atari version featuring classic games such as Pong, Crystal Casltes and Asteroids, and a Terraria version with an exclusive minigame based on the titular game. Whichever version of the Gameband one chooses they get to play games on a 1.63-inch AMOLED display, with a microSD card slot allowing the addition of more titles.

The smartwatch runs on a custom version of Android and pairs with a PC app named PixelFurnace for the transfer of software. One can even store an entire PC game on the Gameband and play it on another PC by plugging the watch in and launching the game on PixelFurnace on that computer.

Continue reading...

What Does the Future Hold for the Switch?

E-mail Print PDF
What Does the Future Hold for the Switch?

March 2017 sees the next Nintendo games machine hit the market-- the strange tablet-console hybrid known as the Switch. Will the 127-year old Japanese company find success with the machine, or will it break it? Analysts are weighing in, and the predictions are, inevitably, varied.

First presented to the world through a slick announcement video on October 2016, the Switch is a machine of many parts. One can play it as one does a tablet or handheld console, but it can also be connected to a dock for home console gameplay on an HDTV. It has two controllers users can either connect to the tablet portion of the machine, use separately as Wii-style motion controllers or even use as single gamepads for 2-player action.

Whichever way one plays with it, the Switch is crucial for a Nintendo reeling from the commercial failure of the Wii U, whose global sales clock at just 13 million units during a 4-year lifespan. Will the Switch buck the trend? Analyst DFC Intelligence predicts Switch sales will reach 40m in 3 years-- behind Playstation 4 sales reaching 50m during the same timeframe, but ahead of the XBox One's 26m units sold.

Continue reading...

The iDevice-Enabled Blood Glucose Monitor

E-mail Print PDF
The iDevice-Enabled Blood Glucose Monitor

One Drop launches the Chrome Blood Glucose Monitoring Kit-- a CE-approved package consisting of a Bluetooth-enabled blood glucose monitor, chrome lancing device, test strips and carry case.

The blood glucose monitor pairs with iDevices (iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch and even Apple Watch) and transmits test results "in just 5 seconds" to the companion One Drop app. The lancing device has custom depth settings to adjust the amount of pressure on a use-by-user basis to draw "a perfect drop of blood every time," while compatible test strips can be acquired via monthly subscription.

Continue reading...

Panasonic's Companion Robot at CES 2017

E-mail Print PDF
Panasonic's Companion Robot at CES 2017

CES the place for companies to show off something weird and wonderful, and Panasonic sticks to tradition with the Desktop Companion Robot-- an egg-shaped robot combining voice recognition with an embedded projector.

The robot stands as tall as a kitchen blender, and acts a bit like a mobile version of Amazon Echo or Google Home speakers. However it is also mobile, since it trundles around on 4 wheels while speaking to users in a cute, almost child-like, voice. On command it can crack open its shell to project video from online sources on any flat surface.

"This test project builds on Panasonic's innovations in robotics including battery and power solutions, vision and sensing, navigation solutions and motion control in a new appealing design," the company says. "This is Panasonic's latest effort in demonstrating network services in a friendly package, and we are showing this robot at CES as a way of obtaining feedback on its features and functions."

Continue reading...

The $300 Photo Book of Apple Products

E-mail Print PDF
The $300 Photo Book of Apple Products

Apple announces what is possibly the ultimate collectible for its most ardent of fans-- "Designed by Apple in California," a 300-page photo book detailing 20 years of Apple products and the design behind them.

Available in 26 x 32cm or 33 x 41cm sizes, the book features 450 photos taken by photographers Andrew Zuckerman. It chronicles the 20-year period between the launch of the original iMac and the Apple Pencil, and is reportedly the result of 8 years of work. As such, it comes printed on "specially milled German paper with gilded matte silver edges, using eight color separations and low-ghost inks" and is "both a testament and a tribute to the meticulous design, engineering, and manufacturing methods that are singularly Apple." Or so the company puts it, at any rate.

Continue reading...

MIT Sets to Cut VR's Cable Problem

E-mail Print PDF
MIT Sets to Cut VR's Cable Problem

Researchers at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) claim to have a solution for the cables holding VR headset users down-- MoVR, a system using high-frequency radio signals to turn any headset wireless.

But how can wireless technology replace the HDMI cables streaming data to VR headsets? After all, VR platforms work in real-time, meaning one cannot use compression to allow for lower data rates. According to MIT the key lies in "millimeter waves" (mmWaves), high-frequency signals many experts believe will be behind the super-fast 5G connectivity of the near future. Such signals handle the 6Gbps data rates required by VR visuals.

However mmWaves come with a hitch, as they are affected by obstacles and reflections-- even briefly moving a hand between a transmitter and receiver blocks the signal-- and require constant line of sight. This is where the MoVR system comes in. A programmable "mirror" detects the direction of the incoming mmWave signal and reflects it towards the receiver on the headset. MIT says the MoVR can "learn" correct signal direction to within 2 degrees, meaning it can correctly configure its angles.

Continue reading...

Page 1 of 12

  • «
  •  Start 
  •  Prev 
  •  1 
  •  2 
  •  3 
  •  4 
  •  5 
  •  6 
  •  7 
  •  8 
  •  9 
  •  10 
  •  Next 
  •  End 
  • »